Lightning Round: November 2012

A couple in formalwear dancing in a grand hall surrounded by antiques and opulent furnishings.The Petrov Proposal
by Maisey Yates

One day on Twitter, I was talking to Jane from DA about Harlequin’s new Kiss line, which debuts next year. I said that “if they’re like HP’s with non-asshole heroes and grown-up heroines, I’ll be in heaven.” That basically describes The Petrov Proposal to a T.

The hero is commitment-averse, but so is the heroine. He’s never arrogant or overbearing and she’s never overmatched or passive. She’s sexually inexperienced, sure, but she’s no naive ingenue. She’s a grown woman with an adult’s understanding of sexuality. There’s verbal sparring, hot makeouts, hotter sex, endearing vulnerable moments and a heartwrenching climax. If it didn’t have that worthless epilogue and that unnecessary Grand Gesture, it’d have been a grade A book.

Still, this one was really, really good. B+

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A woman in a long orange dress made of a bunched up satin material stands off to the right side, pressing her hands against the wall, showing her back to the camera and looking at the viewer over her right shoulder.Midnight Scandals
by Carolyn Jewel, Courtney Milan and Sherry Thomas

This was the rare anthology where all the stories were great. The Milan story was the weakest, and I’d still call it an above average read. Carolyn Jewel’s story was my favorite, as the longing and regret was off the charts.

The anthology features three stories centered around the same country home – Doyle’s Grange – set in three different time periods. Jewel’s story is an angsty second chances story set during the regency. The hero returns to the area after reluctantly parting with her when they were teenagers a decade ago. Wanting a home of her own after her brother comes home with a new wife, the heroine has accepted a local gentleman’s marriage proposal. Of course the hero and heroine discover that time hasn’t exactly dulled their attraction or chemistry at all, which is fun. There’s lots of longing here. Though they may still want each other, they have some heavy stuff in their shared history. B+

Milan set her domestic abuse-themed story in the early Victorian period. After fleeing her father’s house in the wake of an embezzlement scandal, the heroine’s working as a companion to the current lady of the house at Doyle’s Grange. Determined to recover the money her father stole from him, the hero has finally tracked her down. Though he’s certain she’s covering up for her father, he also starts to suspect that she’s not exactly safe at Doyle’s Grange and may not be the villain of the situation. I liked this one, but the romance took a back seat to all the other plot machinations. B-

Thomas’ late-Victorian entry surprised me. Let’s be honest here: the set up is fucking ridiculous. There are meet cutes, and then there’s the heroine mistakenly making out with the hero because he’s a dead ringer for the married man she’s in love with. If that’s not enough, the hero and her obsession are both named Fitz. Don’t tell me. I know. Somehow, I ended up liking the story anyway. It probably helps that I have not read the books these characters are from. It also helps that everyone in the story, heroine included, thinks this set up is ridiculous. There was too much Past Protagonist in this one, but otherwise was a good story of moving beyond first impressions. B-

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Closeup of a couple kissing.Beautiful Mess
by Lucy V. Morgan

Clocking in somewhere between a short story and a novella, this vignette started strong then fizzled out. The narrator’s voice is wicked and funny and oozes youthfulness, but the story was incomplete and unsatisfying. The characters also use a lot of language in the “casual bigotry” category – referring to large pumps as being in “tranny sizes,” calling things “retarded,” and so on – which mirrors how most 24 year olds speak to each other, but some readers might want to give it a wide berth because of it.

I’d read another book by this author because I found her voice fresh and contemporary, but I wanted more from this story than I got. C

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Shirtless guy with a tanned, waxed torso, wearing jeans and a Santa hat. Has a candy cane in his pocket, though he may also be happy to see you.Room at the Inn
by Ruthie Knox

I only read the Knox novella. The O’Keefe story is a teaser prequel that lacks an HEA/ending, and the Sloane story is a fluffy historical. I’m not interested in either right now.

I loved Room at the Inn a lot… until the ending. I think Grand Gestures are cheap and lazy as a rule, but this one felt even weaker tacked onto the end of such a thoughtful and emotional story. How does staging a humiliating, public scene in a church during Christmas Eve services strike anyone as romantic? How does a narcissistic, emotionally manipulative stunt like a public proposal atone for 16 years of narcissism and emotional abuse? It spoiled what had been a top notch story. The hero’s redemption/change of heart was believable and accounted for, and I could see their HEA, but the church stunt was BS. I’ve mentally edited it to give the story a more satisfying ending with 100% less self-centered manipulation. C

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top half: a man embraces a woman from behind. bottom half: a lone rider on a horse is silhouetted by a cloudy sunset.Broken Vows
by Delynn Royer

A marriage of convenience where a heroine promises a retired bounty hunter $20,000 to marry her then divorce her after six months so she can inherit her family’s ranch? Sign me up! To sweeten the deal, the heroine’s a total bitch who has to work on her attitude to win the hero. It’s like it was written just for me.

I do have to warn that the author wrote about the Latino characters totally offensively – “half-breed” is so not an acceptable term – but it was thoughtlessly done, not malicious, and only comes up a few times early in the novel when she’s describing a few side characters. I chose to roll my eyes at the author and keep reading, but other people might want to set the book on fine.

Once I got past that stuff in the early chapters, I really enjoyed the story. Their bickering and bantering is hilarious, and the sexual tension was spicy. Not bad for a $2.99 impulse buy on Amazon. B-

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A closeup of a fireman's face. He's wearing a blue helmet with the number 14 on itAfter the Fire
by Kathryn Shay

This is marketed as romance, but it sure didn’t read like one. Rather than focus on a couple as they fall in love, this book follows three firefighter siblings – Mitch, Jenn and Zach – as they deal with the fallout after a particularly destructive fire. All three decide to make changes in their lives: Mitch swears to do something about his dysfunctional marriage, Jenn is determined to become a mother and Zach wants to stop his destructive behavior that’s left him divorced.

I’m really not sure what compelled me to finish this one. The writing was dry and plagued with info dumps about firefighting. I got totally lost spending equal amounts of time in five characters’ heads watching two pairs of them get HEAs and the odd one out get therapy. Mitch’s wife was a cartoonishly one-dimensional villain (a bad mother! a rich girl unsatisfied with middle-class life! takes pride in her appearance!) and I needed more time spent on Jenn’s romance to buy an HEA after she’d already been divorced twice before. And Zach was just shameless sequel bait. Seriously. Not at all interested in the rest of the series. D

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.Saga, Volume 1
by Brian K. Vaughan (Writer), Fiona Staples (Artist)

When a book opens with a childbirth scene and the first line is the mother yelling, “Am I shitting? It feels like I’m shitting!” how could I not read on?

This is mostly a prologue, like many volume 1 comic trades are, but I’m hooked. From the kickass Alana to her laid-back husband Marko to the ethically-complex bounty hunter The Will and his sidekick Lying Cat (a cat that says only “Lying” when someone isn’t speaking the truth) to the wide variety of side characters, I want to see more of this universe caught up in a war between Alana’s home planet and the moon Marko is from.

That a copy of a romance novel, complete with clinch-style cover, looks to play a role in the effort to hunt down Alana and Marko only sweetens the deal.B

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the bent legs of a woman lying on her back, wearing black garters and stockings.Owning Wednesday
by Annabel Joseph

This was a frustrating read for me. On the one hand, you’ve got moments like this:

But just before she came, the man fucking stopped.

She actually sobbed then. “Daniel, no! Please! Please don’t do this to me. You’ll kill me.”

“Kill you? ‘Here lies Wednesday, total drama queen.’ I’ll visit every week and leave butt plugs on your grave.”

Just about the only thing rarer than a negative pregnancy test in romance is humor and playfulness in BDSM scenes, and I loved that this book went there. It was a unique D/s relationship between two individuals. It even eschewed the collar. Instead, Wednesday wore garters and stockings when their D/s dynamic was “on.”

But, on the other hand, the book is 90% sex scene and 10% Wednesday and Daniel hurting each other with their actions. I like sex as much as the next girl, but if it’s not advancing the plot, I’m bored rather quickly. A lot of it felt gratuitous. And Wednesday and Daniel? While I appreciated that she had a backbone and stood up to Daniel’s obsessive, controlling behaviors, I never felt that the problems were ever resolved. By the end, they still appeared to me as two insecure people mindfucking each other.

So, this one was a mixed bag. I’m being generous by rating it as average, I think. It’s a case of great idea, poor execution. C

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A woman in a pink tank top smiles at the camera while leaning a hockey stick against her shoulder.Offside
by Juliana Stone

This was a strange little book. While I enjoyed reading about a heroine who’s a serious hockey player, and the sexual tension was expertly paced, the book was exceedingly over the top. Everything in it is turned up to 11. The sexist backlash over her joining the men’s beer league, her dementia-addled father pointing a shotgun at the hero while her grandfather’s drawers fall down, the triplet sisters being named Billie-Jo, Bobbi-Jo and Betty-Jo, the prodigal triplet returning just in time to toss a drama bomb – all of these moments felt scripted. It was like the author was poking me in the ribs and saying “ISN’T THAT JUST ZANY?”

I started off entertained, then I was being indulgent, but by the end I was rolling my eyes at the blatant manipulation. It’s a fun book if you don’t try to pin real world logic onto it, but the ending was just a stunt too far for me. C

Rio Grande Wedding by Ruth Wind

A shirtless man in dark jeans with shoulder-length, dark brown hair leans in towards a blonde woman wearing a pink bathrobe. They're in a sunny kitchen, standing next to a counter that has two coffee cups on it.This is another Harlequin I grabbed during the BooksOnBoard Black Friday sale. I saw the words “Green card groom,” and immediately downloaded the sample. Marriages of convenience are one of my very favorite romance tropes, so I was an easy sell.

Widowed nurse Molly Sheffield finds a wounded migrant worker on her property and takes it upon herself to nurse him back to health after he begs her not to call an ambulance. Undocumented immigrant Alejandro Sosa hates to burden the strange woman who’s rescued him, but he can’t risk deportation – not while his eight year old niece is stranded alone in the wilderness after an immigration raid. Struck by Alejandro’s devotion to his niece, or perhaps due to four lonely years alone on her secluded New Mexico farm, Molly decides to do everything she can to keep him together with his niece in America, even if her deputy sheriff brother suspects they’re marrying only to secure a green card.

I really enjoyed this modern take on a marriage of convenience. Wind – who also writes as Barbara Samuel – treats the heady subject with a lot of sensitivity and avoids any grandstanding. Molly’s brother is the story’s antagonist, but he remains sympathetic or at least relatable even with his zero tolerance approach to illegal immigration. Alejandro isn’t some Woobie forced into the role of victim, he’s got some misgivings and doubts over whether he’s making the right decision to work as a migrant laborer in the US. I liked all the characters more for having some flaws.

Where the book wasn’t perfect was in the timing. Everything in the book takes place over a very short period of time. I can buy a week-long whirlwind romance ok, but resolving immigration status, family drama, a gunshot wound *and* tuberculosis as well within a week is a bit much. I really enjoyed the hero and heroine, but I had to put my “this is fantasy” glasses on to digest the neat and tidy ending. B-

~65,000 words
Published October 1st 1999 by Silhouette Intimate Moments

Lightning Round: October 2012

A shirtless man in a cowboy hat embracing a woman holding a gun behind her back and looking straight at the viewer.Chasing Rainbows
by Victoria Lynne

I am a sucker for road romances, foul-mouthed gunslinger heroines, gambler heroes and anything set in the old west, so this scratched all my itches. It also had some fabulous, slow-burning sexual tension that more recent books just don’t seem to have the patience for anymore.

I just found the heroine almost Mary Sue-ish. She spends the bulk of the book being acted upon rather than driving her share of the action, then seems to be rewarded in the end for being such a good person before. For a heroine who was supposed to be a rough-and-tumble outlaw, she constantly needed the hero to bail her out after  she charged into things half-cocked.

I had a lot fun reading it, but it wasn’t the best book it could’ve been. C+ 

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Never Stay Past Midnight
by Mira Lyn Kelly

This author’s books are consistently enjoyable for me (Wild Fling or a Wedding Ring? even got a rare 5* review from me on Goodreads) so just seeing that she has a new book out is enough to get me to buy without so much as a glance at the blurb or the reviews.

Never Stay Past Midnight had all the elements I love this author for. The heroine’s a grown-up with an adult’s life, libido and responsibilities. The hero’s wealthy and successful, but human. Both are reluctant to commit to a relationship, but neither’s reluctance stems from blanket judgments of the other’s gender, or any high-angst disavowals of the existence of love. They just got unresolved baggage from lives that didn’t come with training wheels.

Unfortunately, the strength of that conflict and the depth of their feelings on commitment made the rushed ending unsatisfying. While their fling that became more was charming and believable, the hero’s abrupt about-face on a serious bone of contention weakened the story. B+

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Just about the clinchiest of all clinch covers. Shirtless hero with his arm around the heroine's waist, with her bodice falling down and her hair billowing in the wind. The galloping horses in the background are extra amazing.Texas Destiny
by Lorraine Heath

The heroine heads west to Texas as a mail-order bride after the Civil War destroys her home and family in Georgia. She expects to be met at the train station by her fiance, but is instead met by his younger brother. After falling from a horse and breaking his leg, her fiance couldn’t make the three-week trek each way himself. Hijnks ensue.

Starts slow with a metric fuck ton of angst over the hero’s scars, goes nuts with adjectives and flowery metaphors, but nails yearning and sexual tension like a boss. The end waffled more than an IHOP, but I was invested like whoa. B-

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Illustration of an Old West sheriff leaning against a post while a woman in a full pink skirt and white shirtwaist walks past with her back to the viewer.The Marshal And Mrs. O’Malley
by Julianne MacLean

While I enjoyed the main couple and their romance immensely – there are real obstacles to their getting together and the yearning was palpable – the suspense plot lacked, well, suspense, and the heroine’s son was the most convenient plot moppet of all time. OF ALL TIME.

Highly entertaining, but uneven and unmemorable. C

 

 

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Standard Presents cover. White cover with a red banner at top saying "Harlequin Presents." Then the author's name, followed by book title, is printed on the white background above the circular stock photo of a poorly acted out kiss between a couple.Katrakis’s Sweet Prize
by Caitlin Crews

All of the standard Presents tropes that I usually enjoy – revenge, self-made men, yachting on the Mediterranean, shitbag family drama – were accounted for in this book, but it very much did not work for me at all.

It wasn’t so silly that I stopped reading it, but pretty damn close. It was the way they treated the whole “mistress” thing, like it was a job position. It was really absurd. She not only walks up to him and says, “I had heard you were between mistresses at present. I had so hoped to be the next.” There was also this bizarre exchange:

“While I appreciate your list of rules and regulations, and will make every effort to follow them, being a mistress is much more than the ability to follow orders.” She traced the strong line of his jaw, the proud jut of his chin, with a lazy fingertip—though she felt as far from lazy as it was possible to feel. She kept on. “A good mistress must anticipate her partner’s needs. She must adapt to his moods, and follow his lead. It is like a complicated dance, is it not?”

Is this a Presents, or D/s erotica? As I told Liz, in a contemporary setting, “mistress” should be used like “pooch,” that is, only in tabloid headlines. D

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Close-up shot of a young man with shaggy, dark hair and a wrist tattoo touching the face of a young woman with long brown hair before he might kiss her.Easy
by Tammara Webber

Anyone who wanted to like Beautiful Disaster but just couldn’t hang with the deeply internalized misogyny and textbook abuser archetype hero need to read this book. Everyone else needs to read this book too, but those readers especially deserve to treat themselves. It’s well written and populated with fully-developed characters. A strong theme of respect and empowerment for women runs throughout without ever getting preachy (oh, well, never bad preachy, anyway.) The heroine is self-saving and the hero is just a beautiful person. A-